I get no sleep

I laugh and cry and generally am an emotional wreck.

Atheist, Intersectional Feminist. Bones, Sherlock, Benedict Cumberbatch, Darren Criss, Glee, politics, art, food, and various other tv shows, movies, people, and causes I like.

I have an addiction to capslock.

I love Harry Potter but hate (to the core of my soul) the movies.
Reblogged from humansofnewyork  5,485 notes
humansofnewyork:

“Everything was fine at breakfast. We talked normally. I went to work thinking that it was just a normal day. Then when I came home, the door was locked, which was strange, but I didn’t think much of it. Everything seemed to be in place when I went inside the house. So I sat down and watched TV, expecting them to come home any minute. After awhile, I went upstairs to the bedroom. And that’s when I noticed all her clothes were missing. Then I ran to the children’s room, and all their clothes were missing too. After seventeen years, she left me without saying a word.” (Nairobi, Kenya)

A woman doesn’t just leave, let alone just leave WITH the kids.  Don’t just listen to one side of the story. 

humansofnewyork:

“Everything was fine at breakfast. We talked normally. I went to work thinking that it was just a normal day. Then when I came home, the door was locked, which was strange, but I didn’t think much of it. Everything seemed to be in place when I went inside the house. So I sat down and watched TV, expecting them to come home any minute. After awhile, I went upstairs to the bedroom. And that’s when I noticed all her clothes were missing. Then I ran to the children’s room, and all their clothes were missing too. After seventeen years, she left me without saying a word.” 

(Nairobi, Kenya)

A woman doesn’t just leave, let alone just leave WITH the kids.  Don’t just listen to one side of the story. 

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  2,916 notes
humansofnewyork:

"My father had a heart attack when I was fifteen. I found him on the floor of his study, lying on his side. I could tell his heart had stopped, because all the blood pooled at the bottom of his body. The inch of his body closest to the floor was dark purple. The rest of body was completely white. He was two different colors. And neither of them were normal."

humansofnewyork:

"My father had a heart attack when I was fifteen. I found him on the floor of his study, lying on his side. I could tell his heart had stopped, because all the blood pooled at the bottom of his body. The inch of his body closest to the floor was dark purple. The rest of body was completely white. He was two different colors. And neither of them were normal."

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  19,719 notes
humansofnewyork:

"My dad died in 9/11. They opened up the museum to families today, so I went this morning. My plan was to go to work after, but I just couldn’t do it.""What happened to him?""He was a cop. He actually had the day off. But as soon as he heard, he drove into the city and got there just in time for the second tower to fall. A witness said that my dad had started to run when the tower fell, but turned back because a trapped woman was calling to him.""What do you remember?""I was in science class. And my teacher told us that there had been a plane crash. That’s all she said. Then I noticed all these kids around me getting phone calls and text messages, and they’d run out of class. So I knew something big was happening. Soon we got let out of school. On the ride home, I remember thinking that my dad was going to be working overtime on this. I imagined he’d be down there everyday, saving people. ‘I bet I won’t see him for weeks,’ I said."

humansofnewyork:

"My dad died in 9/11. They opened up the museum to families today, so I went this morning. My plan was to go to work after, but I just couldn’t do it."
"What happened to him?"
"He was a cop. He actually had the day off. But as soon as he heard, he drove into the city and got there just in time for the second tower to fall. A witness said that my dad had started to run when the tower fell, but turned back because a trapped woman was calling to him."
"What do you remember?"
"I was in science class. And my teacher told us that there had been a plane crash. That’s all she said. Then I noticed all these kids around me getting phone calls and text messages, and they’d run out of class. So I knew something big was happening. Soon we got let out of school. On the ride home, I remember thinking that my dad was going to be working overtime on this. I imagined he’d be down there everyday, saving people. ‘I bet I won’t see him for weeks,’ I said."

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  11,371 notes
humansofnewyork:

"You should kiss the ground you walk on if you were born in this country— take it from an old man who once had to wear the Star of David on his shirt. There’s a safety to living in such a diverse place. It’s much more difficult to brainwash a population that is composed of so many different nationalities and so many different viewpoints."

humansofnewyork:

"You should kiss the ground you walk on if you were born in this country— take it from an old man who once had to wear the Star of David on his shirt. There’s a safety to living in such a diverse place. It’s much more difficult to brainwash a population that is composed of so many different nationalities and so many different viewpoints."

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  22,858 notes
humansofnewyork:

"The army stationed me down South when I was younger, and I couldn’t even use the same bathroom as white people. But things have changed so much. The younger generation isn’t nearly as racist. I’ve been sitting here for fifty years. So much has changed. This neighborhood used to be all black. A white person couldn’t even walk down this street. All the races kept to themselves. Now you’ve got Indians talking to Pakistanis, blacks talking to whites, everybody is here and learning from each other’s cultures. I’ve been sitting here for 50 years. Things are getting better."

humansofnewyork:

"The army stationed me down South when I was younger, and I couldn’t even use the same bathroom as white people. But things have changed so much. The younger generation isn’t nearly as racist. I’ve been sitting here for fifty years. So much has changed. This neighborhood used to be all black. A white person couldn’t even walk down this street. All the races kept to themselves. Now you’ve got Indians talking to Pakistanis, blacks talking to whites, everybody is here and learning from each other’s cultures. I’ve been sitting here for 50 years. Things are getting better."